Vadem Clio Handheld PC Indianola IA

Vadem Clio handheld PCs allow users to stay connected to the Internet wherever and whenever with the convenience of a small device with all the capabilities of a laptop. Below you’ll find related articles as well as local companies and providers that will help you in your search.

Herold Computer Services
(515) 282-4843
106 Davis Ave
Des Moines, IA
Pro Network Solutions
(515) 331-0024
4214 Fleur Dr Ste 12
Des Moines, IA
Lightedge Solutions
(515) 471-1000
666 Walnut St Ste 1900
Des Moines, IA
Adeptmax Corp
(515) 280-9500
319 7th St
Des Moines, IA
Advanced Network Technologies
(515) 244-7880
1326 Walnut St
Des Moines, IA
Computers Plus
(515) 243-3729
3117 Summit Vista Dr
Des Moines, IA
Digital Data Resources
(515) 243-3622
525 SW 5th St Ste C
Des Moines, IA
Alliance Technologies Inc
(515) 245-7777
400 Locust St
Des Moines, IA
Infinite Information Systems Inc
(515) 244-1512
1535 Linden St
Des Moines, IA
(515) 282-4784
2600 Grand Ave Ste 216
Des Moines, IA

Vadem Clio: Three H/PC Pros in One

Vadem's sleek Clio gives you the power of an H/PC Pro and a unique three-fold design

At 11.25" x 8.75" x 1" and weighing 3.2 pounds it resembles a notebook PC -- at first glance. But Clio's unique folding hinges let you use the H/PC Pro in three different positions.

ViewFinder a built-in bonus 

Open Clio up and it looks a little like a vanity mirror attached to a keyboard. The backlit 9.4" 640x480 256 color VGA screen tilts forward and back as well as at angles to provide the best viewing angles and location. This design lets the user adjust the screen closer to them. It also moves the center of gravity forward so when you click or draw on the touchscreen you won't knock the unit on its back. Also the keys on the near full-size keyboard are angled out for easier typing. The design is the thinnest H/PC Pro I've seen yet. Finally, the screen is able to sit open for tablet mode operation. When the user switches to this mode, the built-in Calligrapher handwriting recognition software is automatically launched. The user can select which applications to launch in this mode from the control panel. It also has a Display mode for small group presentations. In presentation mode, Clio has no rubber feet so be careful ­ it slides easily on smooth surfaces.

Nice set of hardware features, but...

Clio comes with a PC Card slot, AC adapter slot, serial port, 33.6k software modem and IrDA port (all on the right side of the unit). The notification LED is in the front for easy viewing. Although the Clio's serial port is not standard, a small adapter is included to convert it to a standard 9 pin serial port.

Clio's 10-hour lithium ion battery and its CompactFlash (CF) slot are located in the back of the unit and you must remove the main battery to access the CF slot. The placement of the CompactFlash card has some drawbacks. First of all, you cannot use the CF slot for anything but adding memory. For example, you couldn't connect a CF modem card to a phone line because the main battery would be in the way. Also, to access the CF slot you have to disconnect the main battery, and the backup battery lasts about 10 minutes. Be quick about inserting or removing a CF card. There's a trick to removing the CompactFlash cards since the slot does not have an eject button. Press down on the card with your thumb while you pull back to remove it. The Clio has a nice Control Panel application with a battery meter to help you estimated time remaining on your main and backup batteries.

Under the hood the Clio is powered by an 84 mhz NEC Vr4111 MIPS processor, with an adequate 16 MB of RAM. I recommend that users partition their memory to allow for 4 MB of program execution and 12 MB of storage. This is done from Start -Settings - Control Panel - System. Clio's RAM is upgradeable to 32MB, and its ROM is user upgrad...

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