NEC Pocket PCs Oregon City OR

NEC pocket PCs allow users to stay connected to the Internet wherever and whenever with the convenience of a small device with all the capabilities of a laptop. Read through the following articles to learn more about NEC pocket PCs and find local companies and providers who can help you find what you’re looking for.

L E A Data Technologies
(503) 650-5219
12405 Cominger St
Oregon City, OR
 
Wescott Design Services
(503) 631-7815
18965 S Pear Rd
Oregon City, OR
 
Rusaw & Co
(503) 654-7582
16620 Churchill Dr
Gladstone, OR
 
Oregon Professional Microsystems Ll
(503) 697-4773
20020 Marigold Ct Apt 24
West Linn, OR
 
Group Avalon Technology Services Inc
(503) 653-5000
14419 SE McLoughlin Blvd
Portland, OR
 
T S4
(503) 657-0425
15011 Forsythe Rd
Oregon City, OR
 
Clackamas Community College Draftin
(503) 657-6958
19600 Molalla Ave
Oregon City, OR
 
Clinical Information Systems Inc
(503) 699-9745
18805 Willamette Dr
West Linn, OR
 
A-2-Z Computing Inc
(503) 245-6560
2457 Mustang Ct
West Linn, OR
 
Manage Inc
(503) 353-1721
13101 SE 84th Ave Ste B
Clackamas, OR
 

The NEC MobilePro 790 Handheld PC 200

The NEC MobilePro 790 Handheld PC 200

NEC's new Handheld PC 2000 adds built-in Flash ROM memory and updated software to their successful 1/2 VGA MobilePro mini-notebook computer

I am typing this review using NEC's newest Windows Powered handheld, the MobilePro 790. I'm flying to New York City for the PC Expo computer show. The 1/2 VGA color-screen Handheld PC 2000 sits on an airline tray table with room left over for a glass of water and a small notepad. I've set the Times Roman font in Pocket Word to 18-point blue for easy viewing and editing.

Hal.NEC790.Jet.jpg (16007 bytes)

Hal Goldstein writing this article on a NEC MobilePro 790 Handheld PC 2000 somewhere in the skies between St. Louis and New York.

The passenger squeezed next to me asks, "Is that a laptop?"

I can't give a simple answer. That's the problem.

"Well, it's not exactly a laptop, but I am using a version of Word. Tonight I will answer my e-mail in my hotel room. It runs Windows CE, which is like Windows, but not exactly, since it won't necessarily run the same programs. It has versions of Excel, PowerPoint, Internet Explorer. It contains all my contacts, appointments, and tasks, which I synchronized from my desktop at work. Oh, and it can play music and run videos."

From his look, I could see I hadn't exactly cleared things up.

Perhaps the inability to place the MobilePro 790, the latest Handheld PC 2000, in a known category explains, at least in part, why this class of machines has not attracted many mainstream users. Microsoft and Handheld PC developers consider it only as a "vertical market" device.

NEC and HP are the only major companies today producing Handheld PCs that use the Windows CE operating system and are suitable for both business and consumers. Both NEC, with its first UltraLite, and HP, with the Portable Plus and OmniBook 300, began producing self-contained, instant-on machines in the 1980s. These machines are like Pocket PCs with keyboards. They come with an operating system and an application suite built in, plus battery-powered, non-volatile RAM for storage. The small size, light weight, instant boot, built-in software, and relatively long battery life are all boons for mobile users, and for those who require basic computer capabilities without the headaches.

Unlike the smaller HP Jornada 720, the MobilePro 790 will not fit into your pocket. It must be carried in a shoulder bag or small briefcase. Closed, this super-thin "mini-notebook" computer is a mere 1.1 inches thick, 9.6 inch wide, and 5.2 inch deep. At 1.7 pounds, it's heavier than a Pocket PC, but a lot lighter than most notebooks. Despite the size, you can easily touch type on its 92% full-size keyboard.

I used the MobilePro 790 on this trip to write and take care of e-mail correspondence, on the plane and in my hotel. I also used it to take notes at a seminar. Except for the day of the seminar, I left the MobilePro 79...

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